Change Anything? Yes You Can

There are many roads you can take when making a change but which one?  Here are some actionable ideas to kick of your new year’s change effort – either personally or professionally – and you can start today.  See the video below.

Your ability to change is influenced by your skills more than what you normally think of as willpower.  Willpower is a skill that you can learn and it can be strengthen.  Making change is about developing skills, executing your customized change plan, and engaging all six sources of influence. sixsourcesInfluence_v1

For example, source of influence one – Personal Motivation – deals with the idea of “do you want to do it.”  Make the undesirable desirable is the idea to increase your personal motivation and escape the willpower trap.

I will create posts about each of the six sources of influence in the coming weeks.  For a larger view just click on the image.

According to the research by the authors, if you can use four or more of the six areas of influence on your change challenge, your probability of success increases 10 fold.

One of the best ideas from the book is to invite to “turn a bad day into good data” by you becoming the scientist and subject.

The authors of ‘Change Anything: The New Science of Personal Success’ have summed it up in an easy read of 239 pages or a few hours on CD.  I recommend reading it cover to cover.  If you prefer to hear examples showing how to apply the ideas go to part III. The examples are:

  1. Weight Loss: How to Lose Weight and Get Fit – and Stay That Way, page 151
  2. Financial Fitness: How to Get – and Live – Out o Debt, page 173
  3. Addiction: How to Take Back Your Life, page 192
  4. Relationships: How to Change Us by Changing Me, page 213

You will see how identifying your vital behaviours and using all six sources of influence enable you to create your customized change plan.

Start today and tell me how it works for you.

Tony Robbins: Why we do what we do

In this video Tony Robbins challenges us to think about why we do what we do.  Decisions shape destiny.  Great section where Mr. Robbins, in a respectful and honest way, challenges former Vice President Al Gore on what are the defining factors in achievement.  You will feel challenged to be different and start now.

Tony Robbins: Why we do what we do | Video on TED.com.

Power Poses – Feel More Confident Now

Can the way you hold your body or move, have measurable affects on how you feel?  Absolutely and Dr. Amy Cuddy has research to back it up.  Dr. Cuddy is social psychologist, teaches at the Harvard Business School, and studies our perceptions of others and how others influence us.

Fake it until you make it works and there is evidence to back it up as a useful strategy (for more details see “Power Postures Can Make You Feel More Powerful” (WIRED Science, May 15, 2012.)

The first video is a five minute overview and the second video is a 17 minute presentation about the idea that we can change our feelings about our own status by changing the positions of our bodies.


What do you think?

[Featured image courtesy of Flickr: Poptech]

Pricing Effects On Video Game Portal Sales

Value Corp. are the makers of such hit games as Half Life and Portal. They are giants in digital distribution of PC games where piracy is a huge challenge.   Gabe Newell, the co-founder of Value, gave some off the cuff remarks about experiments they conducted with pricing using the companies Steam distribution system.  The Steam system has more than 35 million users.

The pricing experiments are discussed in detail and are easy to understand.  They tested price reductions and measured multiples of increases in sales rather than percentage increases.  They tested for cannibalization of future sales and the data showed net increase in revenue.

Really interesting read and will give lots to think about.

How Valve experiments with the economics of video games – GeekWire, October 23, 2011 by Todd Bishop.

Building Resilience – Harvard Business Review

ResilienceTraining240x159_USArmyWhat makes one person grow from experiencing a trauma, another gets through it to be basically the same as they were before the trauma (resilience), and yet another fall apart?  Dr. Seligman shows how training can move people towards growth as the result of the trauma.  “These are the people of whom Friedrich Nietzsche said, “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”

Dr. Seligman worked with the US Army to teach positive psychology through an initiative called “Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) and consists of three components: a test for psychological fitness, self-improvement courses available following the test, and “master resilience training” (MRT) for drill sergeants.  These are based on PERMA: positive emotion, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishment—the building blocks of resilience and growth.”

One concern about the training was that it would be see as “touchy-feely” or “psychobabble” by hardened soldiers.  The initiative was extremely well received with participants giving the course a 4.9 out of 5 rating and a many say it is the best course they have ever had in the army.

Building Resilience, By Martin E.P. Seligman – Harvard Business Review, April 2011.

[Image: Flickr user familymwr]