Modern Marketing Essentials Guide To Content Marketing

Sylvia Jensen, senior director EMEA marketing of Oracle Marketing Cloud, does an excellent presentation in this webinar on the three core areas of discipline that marketers can benefit from learning more about. The material is exactually what you would want – easy to understand without being simplistic, presented as a framework to allow for adaption to your situation, and full of actionable information.

The webinar was originally given on April 12, 2016.

You will learn:
How to develop a balanced content marketing plan to support your most significant business objectives
How to mine sources of inspiration to help create meaningful content
How to maximize existing content to create additional assets
Content calendar best practices
Ways to get to know your content comrades within your organization
The idea behind ‘content as data’ (and other must-have content marketing metrics)

Enjoy the video!

Win the Pitch: Tips from MasterCard’s “Priceless” Pitchman

MasterCard-Logo-Font-400x220Understanding your customers motivation to buy is tricky.  Kevin Allen does a great job making it easier to understand by looking at a commercial we all know – the MasterCard “Priceless” ad.

He says winning pitches need three things:

  1. You need to understand that behind every decision lies a hidden agenda.
  2. Your need to do your emotional homework to find the hidden agenda.
  3. You need to connect yourself to the hidden agenda.
    1. Real Ambition: our intention to create something good where nothing existed before.
    2. Your Core Abilities: the special abilities you possess at the core of your being that separate you from others.
    3. Your Credo: the values and belief system to which you subscribe, and/or a shared behaviour or code of ethics that you’re working within.

Now you know what to say, now Deliver like a litigator: You can create your argument, gathering all your facts and supporting evidence around the hidden agenda, which should be placed squarely at the centre of your “case.”  Then, you can create an exciting tale where your audiences attains their deepest desire, not via business-speak, but with good old-fashioned storytelling to convincingly convey your pitch.

Kevin does a great job explaining the process of understanding why your customers buy from you and it is not because you twisted someone’s arm. People want to be understood,  and with that understanding you can tap in “their heart’s desire.”

Read the entire article, Win the Pitch: Tips from MasterCard’s “Priceless” Pitchman – Kevin Allen – Harvard Business Review.

Pricing Effects On Video Game Portal Sales

Value Corp. are the makers of such hit games as Half Life and Portal. They are giants in digital distribution of PC games where piracy is a huge challenge.   Gabe Newell, the co-founder of Value, gave some off the cuff remarks about experiments they conducted with pricing using the companies Steam distribution system.  The Steam system has more than 35 million users.

The pricing experiments are discussed in detail and are easy to understand.  They tested price reductions and measured multiples of increases in sales rather than percentage increases.  They tested for cannibalization of future sales and the data showed net increase in revenue.

Really interesting read and will give lots to think about.

How Valve experiments with the economics of video games – GeekWire, October 23, 2011 by Todd Bishop.

Three Myths about What Customers Want

Sometimes as business owners, we think the conventional wisdom applies to us and this article suggests we should reconsider.

Myth #1: Most consumers want to have a relationship with your brand.

I fall into the 77% of consumers that do have a relationship, and I do not want a relationship, with brands.

The article says this is why attempts to build a relationship through loyalty programs or endless emails do not work for me.

See what you think about the other two myths.  Read the article “Three Myths about What Customers Want” by Karen Freeman, Patrick Spenner, and Anna Bird on HBR online from May 23, 2012.